10 Ways to Cut Pounds — of Waste! — This Thanksgiving

thanksgiving pie

Thanksgiving is around the corner, and we all know how labor-intensive preparing the big meal can be. But we’re not always aware of how much extra waste we create!

On average, household waste increases by 25 percent between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, according to the EPA. We become so busy during the holidays, it can easily become a time to think less and waste more.

This Thanksgiving, try out these tips to keep some of those extra pounds of waste out of the landfill.

1. Remember to bring your reusable bags when grocery shopping, including reusable produce bags.

2. Choose products that have minimal packaging, or packaging that can be recycled. It’s easier to avoid waste by shopping from fresh produce sections, bulk bins and farmer’s markets. Also, food cans are more eco-friendly than plastic packaging, but they aren’t as green as fresh produce brought home in a reusable produce bag.

3. At home, skip the aluminum pan and use a roasting pan instead. A roasting pan will last for a long time, and the aluminum trays getting tossed around the nation add up quickly.

4. Break out your reusable dishes and silverware for the holiday instead of using disposable plates.

5. Use cloth napkins instead of paper napkins — you’ll add elegance and reduce waste at the same time.

6. When serving beverages, opt for tap water over bottled water — you can add some lemon or cucumber slices to jazz it up. You can also make holiday beverages like apple cider, spiced wine or sangria in bulk, instead of serving individual beverage containers.

7. Avoid plastic wrap when storing leftovers by using food storage containers instead.

8. Use natural objects such as gourds, cinnamon sticks, acorns and pinecones to brighten your space instead of shopping for store-bought decor. If you’re feeling crafty, here are some additional ideas from Pinterest:

9. If you’re planning some crafts for the kiddos in your family, recruit them to help make upcycled holiday decor by cutting shapes out of old newspaper, wrapping paper or construction paper.

10. Remember to recycle! If you’re not sure if something belongs in your recycling, just look it up in our Recycling Guide!

As important as it is to reduce waste and recycle, no matter how you choose to celebrate, remember to be thankful for who you’re with and all that you have.

Happy Thanksgiving!

5 Reasons to Recycle for America Recycles Day

recycling

What if you knew there was something easy you could do every day that creates jobs while saving money, energy and water? Actually, there is: Recycling!

To celebrate America Recycles Day, check out these 5 reasons why we should all be recycling, every chance we get.

1. Recycling keeps trash out of the landfill.

According to the EPA, in the U.S. we are currently able to keep 35 percent of our trash out of landfills and incinerators through recycling and composting. In California, we manage to keep 44 percent of our trash out of the landfill. That’s a good start, but there’s still a lot of room for improvement. It’s important to keep as much material out of the landfill as possible because all items that we produce are made from valuable and limited resources. We want to hang onto as much of it as we can for future use.

2. Recycling reduces our need for new raw materials.

Extracting raw materials from the environment is expensive. It also uses up a lot of water and energy. When we recycle, we extract less, which conserves many of our precious (and finite!) natural resources, including trees, water, oil and metals. The more we recycle, the more we protect our resources!

3. Recycling conserves energy.

Recycling saves a lot of energy. Every year, recyclers across the country save the same amount of energy it would take to power 14 million homes for a full year. That’s the equivalent of turning off the power for one out of every 10 homes for an entire year.

4. Recycling creates jobs.

In the U.S., recycling and reuse activities provide 757,000 jobs and produce $36 billion in wages each year. Choosing to recycle isn’t just good for the environment, it’s good for the economy too.

5. Recycling reduces pollution.

The process of extracting raw materials can produce a lot of pollution. Because more recycling means less extraction, it also means less pollution. Even better, when we recycle more, we send less material to landfills. Material decaying in landfills often emits methane, a greenhouse gas 30 times as potent as carbon dioxide, so the less of that, the better!

How Can You Recycle Correctly?

It’s important to recycle correctly! Items that don’t belong in the recycling can damage sorting machinery, causing expensive delays. Also, when the wrong materials get mixed in with the right ones (known as “contamination” in the recycling world), it reduces the value of other recyclables that were sorted correctly.

So how can you find out how to recycle correctly? By using our searchable Recycling Guide. Simply look up any item in our Recycling Guide, and you’ll find tips on recycling, reusing and reducing that item.

Happy recycling!

How to Fix a Hole in a Sweater (Video)

Winter is well on its way, but what if your sweaters aren’t ready for sweater weather?

There’s no need to toss a sweater over small holes. Check out this DIY tutorial to see how you can fix them, and by the time you’re done your sweater will be almost as good as new!

Daylight Saving Time: Time to Make Sure Your Smoke Detector Is Working Properly

smoke detector

November 3 is the end of Daylight Saving Time, which means we have to move the clocks back an hour. Daylight Saving Time is the perfect time to maintenance your smoke detectors!

The risk of dying in a home fire is cut in half in homes with working smoke alarms. When it comes to fire safety, it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

It’s easy to make sure your smoke detector is working properly! Here’s how:

1. Test your smoke detectors once a month. Push the test button to make sure the alarm is working. If it isn’t working, try changing the batteries before replacing the alarm itself.

2. Change the smoke detector battery at least once a year. Find out how to dispose of batteries. If your smoke detector has a lithium battery, you cannot (and should not) replace the lithium battery. Instead, replace the entire smoke alarm as needed, according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

3. Replace your smoke detectors every 10 years. Smoke alarms do not last forever. If you have an alarm that is 10 years old or older, replace it with a new alarm. Find out: Remove each smoke alarm from the wall or ceiling and look on the back to find the date of manufacture. If it is older than 10 years, it needs to be replaced. If it is less than 10 years old, put it back on the ceiling or wall.

What do I do with an old smoke detector?

If you have a photoelectric smoke detector, you can dispose of it as e-waste.

However, most home alarms are ionization smoke detectors, which means they contain a small amount of radioactive material. Dispose of these smoke detectors carefully, as follows:

Toss Those Halloween Candy Wrappers

halloween candy

Halloween is fast approaching, and as you work your way through the never-ending supply of candy, remember that candy wrappers are not recyclable. They need to be thrown in the trash.

Candy wrappers can’t be recycled because they are made of a mix of materials — often a combination of paper, plastic and aluminum — that are difficult and expensive to separate.

However, if you’re organizing a big halloween party, and there’s going to be a ton of candy, consider ordering a TerraCycle Candy and Snack Wrappers Zero Waste Box. This way the wrappers can be mailed in to be recycled through TerraCycle’s special program.

Food Scraps Don’t Belong in the Recycling

dirty food containers

Is your jar half-full of salsa? Does your can still have food in it? Don’t toss them in the recycling! Food scraps contaminate the recycling process.

When food scraps get into your recycling, they make recyclables less clean and less valuable. Food can get stuck in sorting equipment, forcing workers to stop the sorting line to clean it up. Food can also seep into paper products, making the fibers too weak to be recycled — liquids, sticky residue and leftover grease, especially.

Long story short: A batch of food-contaminated recycling can quickly end up in the landfill.

What can you do? Scrape out any containers that once held food. If it’s something really sticky or oily, such as nut butter, honey or mayonnaise, go ahead and give the container a quick scrub.

Afterwards, if a container is really wet, try to let it dry before tossing it in with other recyclables. That way, any paper that’s being recycled will stay dry, too.

Events Happening This Month

We’re hosting a lot of events in Truckee this month! Come get involved and Keep Truckee Green!

Fixit Clinic

Tuesday, October 15th from 5-7:30pm

Truckee Roundhouse | 12116 Chandelle Way, Ste E3, Truckee

Keep Truckee Green and the Truckee Roundhouse are bringing you another Fixit Clinic! Bring your household items needing repair and learn how to fix them from our awesome expert coach volunteers! Bring in clothing, textiles, small electronics, bikes, wooden furniture or other small items and our expert coaches will try to fix them and teach you along the way!

Tools and snacks provided. All ages welcome!

Skilled at taking things apart and putting them back together? Interested in volunteering as a coach? Email us!

Single-Use Reduction Workshop

Tuesday, October 29 from 5:30-7pm

Community Arts Center | 10046 Church St, Truckee

Keep Truckee Green is exploring single-use foodware reduction strategies and wants to hear from you! Help shape Truckee’s single-use policies and join us at a community workshop!

Spanish translation services will be available.

Climate-Ready Truckee Solutions Workshop

Thursday, Nov 7 from 5:30–7:30pm

Community Rec Center | 10981 Truckee Way, Truckee

Truckee needs your help. Our climate is changing, with hotter summers and more extreme storms. Together we can create solutions to reduce their impact. Join us to plan for our community’s future, and make your voice heard.

Spanish translation services will be available.

Recycling Cart Service Begins the Week of 9/30

Recycling cart service begins September 30 – October 4 for all Town neighborhoods (except Tahoe Donner). Here’s all the information you need to know:

  1. I didn’t get a cart, can I still get one?
    YES! Free deliveries to all Truckee neighborhoods except Tahoe Donner and Glenshire have been extended to October 21. Call TTSD to order at (530) 583-7800.
  2. What goes in my recycling cart?
    KTG_Poster-Recycling-without no bags-alt
    Download a sign here.

    – Plastics #1 & 2  plastics1-2
    – Paper & Cardboard
    – Glass
    – MetalClean and empty materials only. That means no liquid or food residue in your containers. Place materials directly into your cart – no blue bags!
  3. What goes in the trash?

    Download a sign here.
    – Food-soiled paper and cardboard (dirty napkins and pizza boxes)
    – Plastics #3-7 (check bottom of plastic container to verify)
    – Soft plastics (plastic bags)
    – Wax-lined paper (almond milk containers and coffee cups)
    – Styrofoam
  4. When is my cart serviced?
    Carts are serviced every-other-week on your regular trash day. Please have carts out by 6 am. Never miss a pick-up: download a calendar or sign up for weekly e-mail reminders!
  5. Where do I place my cart?
    Carts should be wheeled to the street, 3 feet apart from other objects, with wheels facing away from the street, like this:
  6. Can I still use blue bags?
    YES! Blue bags are still accepted. Note however that blue bags are not accepted inside your cart. Please place blue bags next to your trash can and recycling cart.

Liquids Are a Mess for Recycling

half-filled bottles

We’ve all seen people toss half-full bottles of soda into recycling bins, but is this really OK? No. Liquids are bad for the recycling process because most recyclables end up mixing together. When liquids come into contact with paper products, the paper fibers become damaged and impossible to recycle. Liquids also make recycling loads heavier and more expensive to haul, and they create big messes when they spill on the sorting line.

So what should you do? Dump out any liquids from your containers before you recycle them. If a container is really wet, try to let it dry before tossing it in with other recyclables. That way, any paper that’s being recycled will stay dry, too.